Posts Tagged ‘saturday smile’

Silliness, even in the roughest of times, the worst of days, is never unimportant.

Indeed, as I’ve grown older, if not wiser, I’ve come to appreciate silliness as one of the best, the most superlative, things about humanity.

So, after another week when the only sensible reaction to the news is to answer Twitter’s ‘What’s happening?‘ with a hearty ‘how the fuck should I know?’, here’s some much needed silliness.

For this run, I’m going to try and find, each week, three archive clips, one example of something that’s just… nice. And then end every week with something from my mate Mitch, who fortunately has continued to provide videos over the past year.

For this week, however, there’s a theme. You might be able to detect it and wonder why I’ve chosen this theme. A glance to the right should explain why.

Ok, let’s start.

 

Simon Pegg, surgeon, on the phone, from Big Train. We’ve all been there…

 

I never thought that Michael Spicer had nightmares. But when Matt Hancock resigned, and especially WHY he resigned… well, it must have given him night terrors in case he was asked to do a video on all of that… Here’s Michael’s farewell to Hancock, anyway.

 
 
Here’s some more of Johns Bird & Fortune, this time on the NHS.

  
 
This week’s ‘nice’ smile(s): I used to work in telly. I’ve seen a few of these ‘thanks to everyone involved’ videos over the years. I still think this one, from the end of David Tennant’s run on Doctor Who is up there with the best, and best natured, of them all.… 

  
 
An older one from Mitch, but given the anti-vaxxers around right NOW, here’s one from the vaults that’s always worth showing to the sun… Vaccinate Your Kids

 
 
See you tomorrow, with something else… probably related to the image shown above.

Silliness, even in the roughest of times, the worst of days, is never unimportant.

Indeed, as I’ve grown older, if not wiser, I’ve come to appreciate silliness as one of the best, the most superlative, things about humanity.

And some thing don’t change. In the year and a half’\s absence from this place, things are still not great for most people. So, after another week when the only sensible reaction to the news is to answer Twitter’s ‘What’s happening?‘ with a hearty ‘how the fuck should I know?’, here’s some much needed silliness.

For this run, I’m going to try and find, each week, three archive clips, one example of something that’s just… nice. And then end every week with something from my mate Mitch, who fortunately has continued to provide videos over the past year.

Ok, let’s start.

 

You wanted to see Bob Newhart receiving a call from the Colonies, didn’t you? I knew you did.

 

I have very fond memories of the movie Airplane. I saw it the same day I got my O’Level results. The results were ok. The movie was better than ok. Here are some ‘best bits’

 
 
It surprises me to remember, on rewatching this one, just how nuts the reaction was to Monty Python’s Life Of Brian. Not The Nine O’Clock News was having none of it

  
 
This week’s ‘nice’ smile(s): There are two types of people… those who find night shots of small kids getting up to mischief after the lights go out… and those who don’t. If you’re the former, you’ll enjoy these. If not, well, there’s always next week…
 
The first is one that went viral: twin toddlers who really should be going to sleep…
 
The second is what happens when one small child won’t go to sleep and enlists her brother’s aid.

 
 
From the moment Mitch played this one to me, I knew I wanted to see a video of it. Now I’m not saying that’s the reason he made one…. It’s from his most recent Edinburgh show, Ten Songs To Save The World, and it’s a thought I suspect is becoming more serious every day…

 
 
See you tomorrow, with something else.

Silliness, even in the roughest of times, the worst of days, is never unimportant.

Indeed, as I’ve grown older, if not wiser, I’ve come to appreciate silliness as one of the best, the most superlative, things about humanity.

And some thing don’t change. In the year and a half’\s absence from this place, things are still not great for most people. So, after another week when the only sensible reaction to the news is to answer Twitter’s ‘What’s happening?‘ with a hearty ‘how the fuck should I know?’, here’s some much needed silliness.

For this run, I’m going to try and find, each week, three archive clips, one example of something that’s just… nice. And then end every week with something from my mate Mitch, who fortunately has continued to provide videos over the past year.

Ok, let’s start.

 

Here’s another of Randy Rainbow’s moments of genius: SEDITION!

 

Have some Prime Cracker; Robbie Coltrane and Helen Mirren being very silly.

 
 
A classic: Abbott & Costello with Who’s On First?

  
 
This week’s ‘nice’ smile: This delightfully charming animation of how the vaccine works.

 
 
From 2020, Mitch had some advice during lockdown: Do Fuck All… (yeah, this one’s a bit sweary…)

 
 
See you tomorrow, with something else.

Silliness, even in the roughest of times, the worst of days, is never unimportant.

Indeed, as I’ve grown older, if not wiser, I’ve come to appreciate silliness as one of the best, the most superlative, things about humanity.

And some thing don’t change. In the year and a half’\s absence from this place, things are still not great for most people. So, after another week when the only sensible reaction to the news is to answer Twitter’s ‘What’s happening?‘ with a hearty ‘how the fuck should I know?’, here’s some much needed silliness.

For this run, I’m going to try and find, each week, three archive clips, one example of something that’s just… nice. And then end every week with something from my mate Mitch, who fortunately has continued to provide videos over the past year.

Ok, let’s start.

 

One of the joys of the past year has been discovering Randy Rainbow’s glorious parodies. They’re [almost] all fantastic, but there are a few I’ve got a specific love for. This is one of them.

 
 
Funny and relevant. Sadly, always relevant. The ‘Are we the baddies?‘ `sketch from Mitchell and Webb.

 
 
Peter Ustinov explains Post-Keynesian economics… to Fozzie Bear. Because of course he does.

  
 
This week’s ‘nice’ smile: The BBC reminding those of us born… at a more comfortable distance from tne apocalypse… what childrens’ tv used to be like, in a promo entitled Small People

 
 
After the news broke that Dolly Parton had financed vaccine research, and some discovered just how much she’s ploughed into provid8ng books for young children, Mitch Benn had a suggestion…

 
 
See you tomorrow, with something else.

Once again – as it has been for a few weeks – it’s been a shitty week in a shitty year. 

So, once again, here’s some odds and ends to hopefully lighten your load… 

I’ve always enjoyed those Top/”Best Movie [insert thing of choice]’ things… a mixture of nostalgia, fond memories and disagreements… So here are some for you to enjoy as well.

One Hundred Iconic Movie Quotes 

One Hundred Movie Insults

Top 10 Movie swordfights

50 Great movie themes

And to end, something entirely different I came across; the evolution of warp speed depiction in Star Trek

See you tomorrow, with something else. 

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

These appear to be going down quite well, so here’s another set of things to ease your load at the end of yet another ugh week in this ugh of a year. 
Marcus Brigstocke delivers a masterpiece on the three Abrahamic religions…

In case you thought that there are things you can’t make jokes about…

Not The Nine O’Clock News, Gerald The Gorilla

Robin WIlliams does SET LIST

Sir Humphrey Appleby explains to Jim Hacker the Five Standard Excuses. I’ll leave it up to the viewer to decide if theyr’e still being used today

In Space, no one can…?

Something else tomorrow…

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

Once again, entirely unexpectedly, it’s Saturday. 

Entirely expectedly, here’s another Saturday Smile post. 

It’s been an odd seven days, so here are some videos to lighten the end of your week. 

Monty Python on the universe …

For those of us for whom Pluto was always a planet… Mitch Benn has your back.

Shakespeare as it is properly dun

Every Doctor Who televised story… to date.

Sir Humphrey Appleby explains to Jim Hacker the British view of the EEC

Oh, and it’s probably worth pointing out that Mitch Benn Nevr Went Through A Smiths Phase

Something else tomorrow…

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

In Thursday’s entry, in which I wrote about comedy, I said that today’s entry was going to be full of videos from The Distraction Club. For once, a prediction for this seventy-five day countdown to year’s end was accurate. 

Two caveats: Yes, some of these videos are three or four years old… sadly, there aren’t many videos from the last couple of years. Secondly, I mentioned Jess Robinson in Thursday’s entry. You’re about to see why in several of the videos below.

Now, have some comedy and laughter.

Kirsty Newton (and friends) – a version of Bohemian Rhapsody you really REALLY have to see…

the Segue Sisters – Hotel California

Niel Innes, Mitch Benn and the Distractions – I Must Be In Love

Jess Robinson and Kirty Newton… Many Songs To The Voice of Another… and Another… and Another

Ria Lina’s Days of Christmas…

Jess Robinson – Little Voice

Special bonus: The Segue Sisters and Mr Blue Sky

Something else tomorrow, something a bit special, linked to 9th January.

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

I wanted to call this Saturday Smile, as usual, but sorry, after this week, I’m finding it hard to raise a smile… if you are as well, maybe the following will help.

Anyway, some lighter things; some amusing, some funny, some silly moments.

Yes, Prime Minister, on polling…

Time In A Bottle… Muppets

Doctor Who – The Curse of Fatal Death

The incomporable Charles Durning, from The Best Little Whorehouse In Texas

John Oliver’s had some memorable descriptions of the US Election 2016… here they are…

And finally, since you can never have too much Muppets*…

Henson’s  Eleven

This does not apply to the new series; the new series never existed as far as I’m concerned. Never, you hear me?

Something else tomorrow…

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

It’s Saturday, so here’s some odds and sods that’ll hopefully give you a bit of light relief after yet another hard week in 2016.

Since I gave you some YouTube videos last week, here’s something a bit different.

While I enjoy strip cartoons, particularly those with an ongoing storyline, there’s something about the one-panel gag that I particularly appreciate. And though I enjoy editorial cartoons (I particularly recommend the work of Ann Telnaes of The Washington Post if you’re into them), there’s something different, something especially appealing to me about the timeless ones. Like this:

and:

And cartoons regarding my previous profession… all of which I enjoy immensely.

And then there’s Bad Newspapers (which used to be known as Criggo). Enjoy.

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

I used to do this fairly regularly; after a week of blogging, just put something trivial up here. And after the year we’ve all had, I think no-one would really object to a moment, or a few minutes anyway, of light relief. 

And if they did object, to be honest, they’re less than likely to be reading this thing anyway.

When I started typing the words above, there was an element of artifice. I knew when I set up this run of seventy-five entries counting down to 2017 that it would include a set of Saturday Smiles but also know the words above are nothing but the truth. It’s been a shitty year so far. Some occasional moments of light relief, some moments of genuine enjoyment, but on the whole, no, not a good year.

And then I heard, while I was typing the above, that Steve Dillon had died. 

I almost cancelled the blog for today but here’s some stuff that – if you want or need a smile – is just for you.

One of my favourite ever animations: Pigeon Impossible

Followed by one of my favourite ever BBC promos: Generations

Two more, I think…

I’m hoping this is an unreleased scene from the cantina scene in , but probably not.

There are openings to movies… and then there’s this, from A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum

Comedy tonight? Something else, tomorrow.

This post is part of a series of blog entries, counting down to 1st January 2017. You can see other posts in the run by clicking here.

I used to do this fairly regularly; after a week of blogging, just put something trivial up here. And after the week we’ve been through, I think no-one would really object to a moment, or a few minutes anyway, of light relief. And if they did object, to be honest, they’re less than likely to be reading this thing anyway.

So, a couple of light relief videos: some comedy, and an old favourite.

  John Bird and the late John Fortune explain the sub-prime mortgage credit crunch

Animusic

Oh, it’s been a while since I’ve done one of these, but given that so many of my friends right now appear to need a smile, a hug, or just a moment’s respite from everything, I figured why not?

So, what to give you?

How about a little something from Tom Lehrer entitled The Masochism Tango…?

It’s also been a while since I’ve thrown you anything from one of the most wonderful sites on the web: criggo.com; here are some choice examples of… well, something.

And finally, one for the parents reading. I’m pretty sure all of you will recognise this particular event in parenthood, from the always wonderful Calvin & Hobbes:

I used to so these every so often, a bit of light relief from the ongoing rigours of real life, a chance to sit back, or at least lean back on a wall, and watch something that’ll lighten the load or even make you laugh.

Haven’t done any of them for a long while.

Time to change that, methinks.

So, here are a couple of videos:

Ocean’s Eleven trailer by The Muppets
The accompanying blurb on youtube says:

This piece was a scholastic project for a non-linear editing class. The audio is borrowed from the 2001 “Ocean’s 11” trailer directed by Steven Soderbergh and with original music by David Holmes. The video clips are borrowed from one of my favorite films, “The Great Muppet Caper” (1981) directed by Jim Henson. *No copyright infringement intended…this project was done for purely academic purposes.*

Enjoy:

And… not sure how many will get this, but why not? A classic short piece from a much neglected show from the early 80s, Three Of A Kind. Yes, that is Tracy Ullman and Lenny Henry.

In what’s become a habit (too soon, I think, to call it a tradition), something to make you smile. I only wish I knew the names of the many, many contributors or the person who compiled it. But, alas, I don’t.

History Of The World until 1914
(compiled from student howlers)

The inhabitants of Egypt were called mummies. They lived in the Sarah Dessert and travelled by Camelot. The climate of the Sarah is such that the inhabitants have to live elsewhere, so certain areas of the dessert are cultivated by irritation. The Egyptians built the pyramids in the shape of a huge triangular cube. The Pyramids are a range of mountains between France and Spain.

The Bible is full of interesting caricatures. In the first book of the Bible, Guinesses, Adam and Eve are created from an apple tree. One of their children, Cain asked, “Am I my brother’s son?” God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac on Mount Montezuma. Jacob, son of Isaac, stole his brother’s birthmark. Jacob was a patriarch who brought up his twelve sons to be patriarchs, but they didn’t take to it.

One of Jacob’s sons, Joseph, gave refuse to the Israelites. Pharaoh forced the Hebrew slaves to make bread without straw. Moses led them to the Red Sea, where they made unleavened bread, which is bread made without any ingredients. Afterwards, Moses went up to Mount Cyanide to get the Ten Commandments. David was a Hebrew king skilled at playing the liar. He fought with the Philatelists, a race of people who lived in Biblical times. Solomon, one of David’s sons, had 500 wives and 500 porcupines.

Without the Greek’s, we wouldn’t have history. The Greeks invented three kinds of columns – Corinthian, Doric and Ironic. They also had myths. A myth is a female moth. One myth says that the mother of Achilles dipped him in the River Stynx until he became intolerable. Achilles appears in “The Iliad”, by Homer. Homer also wrote “The Oddity” in which Penelope had the last hardship that Ulysses endured on his journey. Actually Homer was not written by Homer, but by another man of that name.

Socrates was a famous Greek teacher who went around giving people advice. They killed him. Socrates died from an overdose of wedlock.

In the Olympic Games, Greeks ran races, jumped, hurled the biscuits and threw the java. The reward to the victor was a coral wreath. The government of Athen was undemocratic because the people took the law into their own hands. There were no wars in Greece, as the mountains were so high they couldn’t climb over to see what their neighbours were doing. When they fought the Parisians, the Greeks were outnumbered because the Persians had more men.

Eventually, the Ramones conquered the Greeks. History calls people Romans because they never stayed in one place for very long. At Roman banquets, the guests wore garlic in their hair. Julius Caesar extinguished himself on the battlefield of Gaul. The Ides of March killed him because they thought he was going to be made king. Nero was a cruel tyranny who would torture his subjects by playing the fiddle to them.

Then came the Middle Ages. King Alfred conquered the Dames, King Arthur lived in the Age of Shivery, King Harold mustarded his troops before the Battle of Hastings. Joan of Arc was canonised by George Bernard Shaw and the victims of the Black Death grew boobs on their necks. Finally the Magna Carta provided that no free man should be hanged twice for the same offence. In midevil times, most of the people were alliterate. The greatest writer of the time was Chaucer, who wrote many poems and verse and also wrote literature. Another take tells of William Tell, who shot an arrow through an apple while standing on his son’s head.

The Renaissance was an age in which more individuals felt the value of their human being. Martin Luther was nailed to the church door at Wittenberg for selling papal indulgences. He died a horrible death, being excommunicated by a bull. It was the painter Donatello’s interest in the female nude that made him the father of the Renaissance. It was an age of great inventions and discoveries. Gutenberg invented the Bible. Sir Walter Raleigh is a historical figure because he invented cigarettes. Another important invention was the circulation of blood. Sir Frances Drake circumcised the world with a 100-foot clipper.

The government of England was a limited mockery. Henry VIII found walking difficult because he had an abbess on his knee. Queen Elizabeth was the “Virgin Queen”. As a queen, she was a success. When Elizabeth exposed herself before her troops, they all shouted “Hurrah”. Then her navy went out and defeated the Spanish Armadillo.

The greatest writer of the Renaissance was William Shakespear. Shakespear never made much money, and is famous only for his plays. He lived in Windsor with his merry wives, writing tragedies, comedies and errors. In one of Shakespear’s famous plays, Hamlet rations out his situation by relieving himself in a long soliloquy. In another, Lady Macbeth tries to convince Macbeth to kill the king by attacking his manhood. Romeo and Juliet are examples of a heroic couplet. Writing at the same time as Shakespear was Miguel Cervantes. He wrote “Donkey Hote”. The next great author was John Milton. Milton wrote “Paradise Lost”. Then his wife died and he wrote “Paradise Regained”.

During the Renaissance, America began. Christopher Columbus was a great navigator who discovered America while cursing about the Atlantic. His ships were called the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Fe. Later the Pilgrims crossed the Ocean, and this was called the Pilgrims’ Progress. When they landed at Plymouth Rock, they were greeted by the Indians, who came down the hill, rolling their war hoops before them. The Indian squabs carried porpoises on their back. Many of the Indian heroes were killed, along with their cabooses, which proved very fatal to them. The winter of 1620 was a hard one for the settlers. Many people died and many babies were born. Captain John Smith was responsible for all of this.

One of the causes of the Revolutionary War was the English put tacks in their tea. Also, the colonists would send their parcels through the post without any stamps. During the war, Red Coats and Paul Revere was throwing balls over stone walls. The dogs were barking and the peacocks crowing. Finally, the colonists won the war and no longer had to pay for taxis.

Delegates from the original thirteen states formed Contented Congress. Thomas Jefferson, a Virgin, and Benjamin Franklin were two singers of the Declaration of Independence.. Franklin had gone to Boston carrying all his clothes in his pocket and a loaf of bread under each arm. He invented electricity by rubbing cats backwards and declared “A horse that is divided against itself cannot stand.” Franklin died in 1790 and is still dead.

George Washington married Martha Curtis and in due time became the Father of Our Country. Then the Constitution of the United States was adopted to secure domestic hostility. Under the Constitution, the people enjoyed the right to keep bare arms.

Abraham Lincoln became America’s greatest Precedent. Lincoln’s mother died in infancy, and he was born in a log cabin he built with his own hands. When Lincoln was President, he wore only a tall silk hat. He said “In onion, there is strength.” Abraham Lincoln wrote the Gettysburg address while travelling to from Washington to Gettysburg on the back of an envelope. He also signed the Emasculation Proclamation, and the Fourteenth Amendment gave the ex-Negroes citizenship. But the Clue Clux Clan would torcher and lynch the ex-Negroes and other innocent victims. On the night of April 14 1865, Lincoln went to the Theatre and got shot in the seat by one of the actors in a moving picture show. The believed assinator was John Wilkes Booth, a supposedly insane actor. This ruined Booth’s career.

Meanwhile, in Europe, the enlightenment was a reasonable time. Voltare invented electricity and also wrote a book called “Candy”. Gravity was invented by Isaac Walton. It is chiefly noticeable in the Autumn when the apples are falling off the trees.

Back was the most famous composer in the world, and so was Handel. Handel was half German, half Italian and half English. He was very large. Bach died from 1750 to the present. Beethoven wrote music even though he was deaf. He was so deaf he wrote loud music. He took long walks in the forest even when everyone was calling for him. Beethoven expired in 1827 and later died for this.

France was in a very serious state. The French Revolution was accomplished before it happened. The Marseillaise was the theme song of the French Revolution and it catapulted into Napoleon. During the Napoleonic Wars, the crowned heads of Europe were trembling in their shoes. Then the Spanish gorillas came down from the hills and nipped at Napoleon’s flanks. Napoleon became ill with bladder problems and was very tense and unrestrained. He wanted an heir to inherit his power, but since Josephine was a baroness, she couldn’t bear him any children.

The sun never sets on the British Empire because the British Empire is in the East and the sun sets in the West. Queen Victoria was the longest Queen. She sat on a thorn for 63 years. Her reclining years and finally the end of her life were exemplary of a great personality. Her death was the final event which ended her reign.

The nineteenth century was a time of many great inventions and thoughts. The invention of the steamboat caused a network of rivers to spring up. Cyrus McCormick invented the McCormick Raper, which did the work of a hundred men. Samuel Morse invented a code for telepathy. Louis Pasteur discovered a cure for rabbis. Charles Darwin was a naturalist who wrote the “Organ of the Species”. Madman Curie discovered radium and Karl Marx became one of the Marx Brothers.

The First World War, caused by the assignation of the Arch-Duck by a surf, ushered in a new error in the anals of human history.